Educational Objectives and Training

Fig 1: Photograph of students on March 30 at the arrival of DOW on campus. From left to right: Brandon Molyneaux, Anthony Rossi, Ashley Orehek, Daniel Harp, and Elizabeth Morehead.

The main objective of MEDOW was to advance student understanding of the weather radar as an instrument and its applications in the study of specific meteorological phenomena by allowing the students to have a direct hands-on experience. The project was primarily designed for students enrolled in the Radar Meteorology (ESCI 449: 29 students), but students in two other courses: Meso- and Storm-Scale Meteorology (ESCI 444: 19 students) and Physical Meteorology (ESCI 344: 22 students) also participated in training and observation periods. Radar Meteorology is a 400-level undergraduate course which serves as an elective for meteorology majors, but as the enrollment suggests, it is a popular elective. Students in this course learned the fundamentals of radar, operations, and products prior to the DOW’s arrival. In addition, the students were provided with background information on the DOW, its capabilities and applications as discussed in a number of papers based on field projects that utilized the DOW system. Students in Meso- and Storm-Scale Meteorology and Physical Meteorology also learned about the DOW and its applications as applied to topics covered in these courses such as the storm structure and radiative transfer.

For the duration of the DOW 6 visit, 35 students completed the extended training sessions (40 minutes) conducted by CSWR technician Alycia Gilliland. The training sessions began on March 30th and continued through April 5th. In addition to the training seminars, Dr. Josh Wurman from CSWR traveled to Millersville University and presented a seminar on March 30th as part of the seminar series for the Millersville University Student Chapter of the American Meteorological Society. On March 31st, he also provided a technical lecture for the combined sections of the Radar Meteorology and Meso- and Storm-Scale Meteorology courses. Furthermore, Dr. Pamela Heinselman from the National Severe Storms Laboratory provided a talk on the Phased Array Radar for the students in the Radar Meteorology course on April 4th while the DOW 6 was on campus. Her talk included case studies and comparisons with DOW data and applications and provided the students with an additional opportunity to learn about the DOW system in a larger context.

   
 
Fig 2: Dr. Wurman presented a seminar as part of the Student Chapter of the American
Meteorological Society’s speaker series for the undergraduate meteorology students.