RAF Bulletin No. 3

THE NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR):

OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY OF CAPABILITIES


The purpose of this Bulletin is to acquaint prospective users with the capabilities of the NSF/NCAR C-130Q Hercules aircraft (Tail Number N130AR). Its long-range and large-payload capabilities provide an ideal platform for a variety of applications in airborne geosciences research. The aircraft can make worldwide airborne measurements not only in the atmospheric sciences but also in disciplines such as oceanography and other earth sciences. The aircraft is available for research with an extensive set of standard instruments.

Introduction

The Lockheed C-130Q Hercules is a four-engine, medium-size utility aircraft which has proven to be one of the most well-known and versatile aircraft ever built. For reference purposes, the aircraft is similar to a standard model C-130H except for electrical and air-conditioning modifications. It has twice the heating/cooling capacity of a standard C-130H and ultimately more than twice the electrical power. (At present only about 90 kVA are available for research.) The aircraft is an all-metal, high-wing monoplane, powered by four Allison T-56-A-423 turbo-prop engines. It is equipped with dual-wheel, tricycle landing gear with the main gear wheels arranged in tandem and the nose gear arranged side-by-side. N130AR was placed in service (by the USN) in 1985 and is the youngest aircraft in the NSF/NCAR/RAF fleet.

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Figure 1. The NSF/NCAR C-130Q (N130AR) aircraft.

The performance figures for the NSF/NCAR C-130Q Hercules aircraft are summarized in Table 1 below. Research Aviation Facility Bulletin No. 6, presents detailed information for scientists to outline realistic, research flight plans. During a research program, the NCAR pilots, who are responsible for the detailed planning of specific flight profiles, will work closely with the requestor.

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Figure 2. Three views of the C-130Q aircraft.


The interior of the Hercules includes a flight deck and a "payload" cabin compartment. During flights, the flight deck has a crew of three and a mission-scientist station position. This area also has two crew-rest positions which can accommodate two temporary observer stations. The aft cabin area is approximately 40 feet long, 9 feet in height, and 10 feet wide. An integral loading ramp and cargo door system is located under the tail section. Figure 3 shows the cross section of the fuselage. The configuration of the cabin can be changed to accommodate individual project instrumentation needs. Sectionalized seat tracks (rails) are installed to rack up instrumentation anywhere in the cabin area.

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Figure 3. C-130Q fuselage cross section.


Aircraft Modifications

RAF has modified the C-130Q aircraft to accommodate a wide variety of instrumentation used for geosciences research. Figure 5 shows the external configuration of the aircraft modifications, which includes:

  • Nose Section
    • A radome differential-pressure gust-probe system
    • Several instrument-mounting pads just aft of the randome for sensor mounting
  • Fuselage Section--Apertures
    • Five rectangular (18 x 27 cM), side-looking, fuselage apertures which can be used as sensor view ports or for equipment exposure to the airstream
    • Two large (40 cM diameter) circular apertures on the fuselage center-line at FS 687 for up-looking and down-looking sensor exposure
    • Two down-looking rectangular apertures, one at FS 267 (31 x 41 cM) and another at FS 627 (25 x 198 cM)
    • One up-looking circular aperture at FS 305 (18 cM diameter)
  •  
  • Wingtips--Wingtip pylons each of which can carry two PMS canisters
  •  
  • External Instrument Pods--Two external instrument pods are located outboard of engines No. 1 and No. 4. These can be used for housing instruments such as scanning radiometers, cloud-physics type probes (3 each) and for other instrumentation that requires a minimum of airflow disturbance. The payload limit is approximately 600 lbs for each of the pods. Their center-of-gravity limit is rather small.

    Utilization of the instrument pods for user-supplied instrumentation could require significant lead time to complete engineering design and fabrication requirements. (These requests have to be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.)

  • Community Aerosol Inlet--This multi-purpose air inlet, designed primarily for aerosol sampling, can be installed on the right side of the fuselage. The inlet's design should minimize the effects of flow distortion around the fuselage and in variations in angle of attack, as well as minimize sampling errors due to the inlet itself. It is currently being evaluated to determine its performance in terms of matching airflow and particle transmission requirements. When the inlet's performance can be adequately established, it will be used routinely for projects requiring aerosol measurements.
  •  
  • Seat Rails--Sectionalized seat rails can be installed, as required, to rack-up instrumentation in the aft (cabin) area.
  •  
  • Electrical Power--A complete electrical system distributes power throughout the aircraft, providing 28 V d.c. and 115 V a.c. at frequencies of 60 and 400 Hz. Currently available: 11 kVA @ 28 Vdc, 21 kVA @ 60 Hz and 90 kVA @ 400 Hz.
  •  
  • Dispensing Chutes--Two chutes are planned in the aft section of the aircraft to dispense meteorological and oceanographic dropsondes.
  •  
  • Instrumentation Racks--Several instrumentation racks are available in the aft cabin for mounting RAF and user-supplied instruments. Figure 4 shows the size of standard, double-bay racks. The allowable weight in the instrumentation rack is 408 kg (900 lbs), but the allowable overturning moment cannot exceed 186 kg-m (16,200 lb-in). (The moment arm is measured from the bottom of the bay opening to the center of gravity of the equipment.) Special racks can be accommodated, as required; they will be reviewed by the RAF for load-carrying capability and must conform to the design requirements of Research Aviation Facility Bulletin No. 13.
    diagram (5661 byte gif)
    Figure 4. RAF's instrumentation rack; each bay is 19" wide.
  •  
  • Quiet Area--A forward section of the cabin area is designated as a "quiet area" with doors separating it from the remainder of the cabin. It has been augmented with extensive sound proofing. The data system operator and the data system display reside in this area. Researchers with noisy equipment are encouraged to locate either the noisy portion of their apparatus or the entire apparatus outside of the quiet area.
  •  
  • Aft Cargo Door/Ramp--The aircraft may be operated unpressurized with the ramp lowered and locked in the horizontal position. The ramp is heavily structured, and apparatus could be extended to overhang the ramp's lip after takeoff. Further aft, the upper cargo door, which swings up, can also be opened and locked in place in flight either by itself or in combination with the ramp. The ramp/door combination provides the capability to drop large objects from the aircraft either by parachute extraction or by free fall in combination with a standard C-130 cargo-handling system. (The cargo-handling system is not available on this aircraft in its present configuration. RAF is planning to explore the availability and resources required for such a system. Future editions of this Bulletin will provide an update.)


Instrumentation

The standard research instrumentation aboard the aircraft is quite extensive. The specific set of instruments flown on a given project is generally a subset of the complete instrumentation list given in Table 2. Refer to other RAF Bulletins for details of the various instruments and equipment. RAF assumes responsibility for installing, calibrating, and maintaining the requested RAF-supplied instrumentation.

The NSF/NCAR C-130Q Hercules aircraft has been modified to accommodate a wide variety of instrumentation used for atmospheric and oceanographic research. These modifications and sensor-mounting locations are shown on the schematic in Figure 5.

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Figure 5. View showing the meteorological instrumentation for the C-130Q.


Measurement Systems

  • Aircraft geographic position is available from an Inertial Reference System (IRS) and from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.
  •  
  • The aircraft attitude (pitch, roll, and heading) and the horizontal and vertical components of aircraft ground speed are available from the IRS.
  •  
  • Angles of attack and sideslip are measured by a differential-pressure, flow-angle sensor consisting of an array of five pressure ports in the nose radome. (For details of this technique, see Brown, et al., Ref. 1.) The radome can be heated to prevent ice accumulation during icing conditions.
  •  
  • Radar altimetry is available to determine the aircraft's geometric height above the surface. (High-resolution vertical GPS height may be incorporated at a later date.)
  •  
  • Measurement of mean and fluctuating components of the wind (u, v, w, and u', v', w') are available with a resolution sufficient for calculating turbulent fluxes up to 10 Hz equivalent wavelength. For specifications of the air velocity components, see Table 3 below.
  •  
  • Atmospheric State Parameters include ambient temperature, static (barometric) and dynamic (pitot) pressure, dew point, and water vapor fluctuations.
  •  
  • Radiation Measurements--Radiometric airborne measurements of hemispheric radiation (visible, infrared, and ultraviolet) are available, both in up- and down-looking modes. Radiometric surface, sky, and in-cloud temperature measurements also can be obtained. An Airborne Imaging Microwave Radiometer (AIMR) and Multichannel Cloud Radiometer (MCR) also are available. (See Special Instruments below.)
  •  
  • Cloud Physics--Extensive instrumentation is available to measure aerosol, cloud droplet, and precipitation size spectra as well as measurements of cloud liquid water content and icing rate.

    Aerosol, cloud droplet and precipitation spectra can be obtained from Particle Measuring System's (PMS) probes (either 1D or 2D). The C-130Q can carry up to 10 of these probes.

  • Air Chemistry Measurements--A variety of chemical species can be measured on the aircraft. Instruments for routine sampling of condensation nuclei (CN), ozone (1 Hz), and carbon monoxide are available. Measurements of other chemical species (listed on Page 6 of Table 2) are available through special arrangements. (See Special Instruments below.)
  •  
  • Weather Avoidance Radar--The weather avoidance radar aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130Q is a Collins WXR-700C, a C-band Doppler radar that can display radar reflectivity, areas of turbulence or a combined reflectivity-turbulence display. The Doppler display only operates at ranges less than 90 kM. The radar also has a ground-mapping mode. The C-band transmit frequency of this radar provides improved storm penetration capabilities than would an X-band radar, thus improving the ability of the C-130Q to penetrate storms while avoiding the more intense storm areas. Reflectivity and velocity data can be recorded and displayed on any on-board workstation. Plans are underway for developing a combined aircraft track and radar display in real time. The main cockpit radar display is repeated in the quiet room area.
  •  
  • Documentation of the Weather Situation--Color video cameras are available to record weather conditions during the research missions. Locations are: in the cockpit for forward view; inside the cabin for side- and down-looking views.
  •  
  • A research InterCommunications System (ICS) is available for use by the project participants during research operations. During the preparation phase, an RAF Project Manager will inform and familiarize the requestor with the ICS to ensure that it can be used to its full potential.
  •  
  • Atmospheric aerosols can be remotely mapped using an Aerosol Lidar.
  •  
  • Electric Field--Electric field strength measurements can be made by electric field mills.


Data Sampling and Recording

A second-generation Aircraft Data System (ADS2) has been developed using a distributed-sampling approach. Four Data System Modules (DSM) are located at strategic points around the aircraft and communicate with each other and with display computers through a distributed computer network.

Analog and digital inputs from the instrumentation are sampled, recorded, and displayed by a Linux PC computer-controlled data system. The data are recorded on 36GB disks and backed up by Exabyte (Model EXB-8505) 8mm tape cartridges (currently with 4.0 Gb capacity). Two drives are used for redundancy. Sampling rates available for all measurements are 5, 25, 250 and 1K sps (higher for special requirements). All channels are simultaneously sampled and digitized at 10K sps. Each analog channel includes a single-pole, 5 KHz, anti-alias filter. The sampled data are decimated with FIR (finite impulse response) digital filters. Each DSM can sample up to 64 analog channels plus blocks from various serial devices, such as navigation systems and PMS 1-D and 2-D probes. This new system supports user-provided workstations (generic UNIX with TCP/IP protocol) aboard the C-130Q using the in-flight network.



Real-Time Data Display (WINDS)

Real-time data display is through the WINDS (WINdow Display System) software system. The system displays aircraft data in either real-time or post-processing mode. This interactive display system includes a variety of x-y plots, (e.g., time series, skew-t log-p, sounding, and track), fixed and scrolling alphanumeric lists, 1D-probe histograms and 2D probe images. Displays can be printed in color with on-board PostScript color printers. (See details of the WINDS system by Horton, 1994, Ref. 2.)

Data system display stations are located on the flight deck for the mission scientist position and in the "quiet room" area. One or two additional interactive display stations can be made available in the payload area depending on the project's requirements. Video cameras mounted in the cockpit and on the side of the aircraft can be viewed in real time on any of the display stations.



Data Processing and Documentation

Extensive documentation is provided to the users following each project.

Data files (and tapes) generated during flights are processed and quality controlled by the RAF Project and Data Support Group to produce output files containing data (in engineering units) from measured and derived variables. The standard RAF data set consists of 1 sample-per-second (sps), averaged data from all measured variables. (See Research Aviation Facility Bulletin No. 9.) After the standard data processing is completed, high rate (25 sps) data may be provided by special request for certain flight segments.

Please note that flux calculations derived from high-rate scalar measurements can be affected by measurement uncertainties associated with flow distortion around the aircraft. Investigators are encouraged to contact RAF to discuss any planned application of this technology. (See Ref. 3.)

Usually accompanying C-130Q field projects is a quick-look, post-flight, data-processing system. This computer system is used primarily for quality assurance but is also available for limited data processing.



Special Instruments

Several special instrument packages can be made available to C-130Q users on an "as needed" basis. These must be specifically requested. The deployment of the Dropwindsonde depends upon resources provided by the EOL In-Situ Sensing Facility (ISF) at NCAR. The special air chemistry equipment and the passive remote sensing tools (AIMR and MCR) are held in the RAF but may incur substantial additional deployment costs.

  • Dropwindsonde--A light-weight dropwindsonde can be launched from the C-130Q. This dropwindsonde system consists of an aircraft data system and a light-weight, digital sonde (300 g) developed and supported by RTF. The sondes can provide temperature, humidity, and wind data profiles while descending to the surface.

    Inquiries concerning dropwindsonde requests should be directed to Steve Cohn, ISF, Earth Observing Laboratory voice: (303) 497-8826, FAX: (303) 497-8770 or via email.

  • Special Air Chemistry Measurements--Measurements of CO2, fast-response O3 and other chemical species require special arrangements with RAF before they can be made available for a given project.

    Inquiries concerning chemistry instruments should be directed to Teresa Campos, Research Aviation Facility, Atmospheric Technology Division, voice: (303) 497-1879, FAX: (303) 497-1092 or via email.

  • Airborne Imaging Microwave Radiometer (AIMR)--This instrument is a passive remote sensing system that produces images of the terrain below the aircraft, sensing the thermal radiation emitted from the surface. Four channels at two frequencies (37 and 90 GHz) and two polarizations provide the brightness temperature maps. Applications can be for soil moisture, ice reconnaissance and snow depth mapping, measurements of ocean temperature and salinity, and others.

    The AIMR is a special instrument and may be available from RAF through special arrangements. Inquiries should be directed to Amanda Cox, RTF, Atmospheric Technology Division, voice: (303) 497-2032, FAX: (303) 497-8770 or via email.

  • NASA/NCAR Multichannel Cloud Radiometer (MCR)--This instrument is a scanning radiometer with six channels in the near infrared and one channel in the thermal infrared. The MCR is ideally suited for remote observation of cloud physical properties, such as optical thickness, cloud top temperature, optical mean radius, thermodynamics phase, and others.

    The MCR is a special instrument and may be available from RAF through special arrangements. Inquiries should be directed to Julie Haggerty, RAF, Earth Observing Laboratory, voice:  (303) 497-1090, FAX:  (303) 497-1092 or via email.



User Interface

Considerable freedom is permitted in mounting user-supplied instrumentation on the aircraft. Procedures and limitations are described in detail in Research Aviation Facility Bulletin No. 11. (No longer available - replaced by C-130 Investigators Handbook Chapter 5: Investigator Equipment Packages) RAF will supervise the installation of all user-supplied instrumentation to ensure compatibility with existing RAF instrumentation and the data system, and to satisfy aircraft safety requirements. The user-supplied equipment must be designed to satisfy the requirements of Research Aviation Facility Bulletin No. 13.

RAF can advise and, in some instances, assist users in the aeronautical, chemical, and electrical engineering design and fabrication of special equipment. Guidance in sampling and measurements can also be provided. RAF can help project scientists with experimental design and planning, including flight planning.



References

1. Brown, E.N., C.A. Friehe, and D.H. Lenschow (1983): The use of pressure fluctuations on the nose of aircraft for measuring air motion. J. Climate and Appl. Met., 22, 171-180.

2. Horton, G. (1994): A graphical user interface system for real-time and post-processing display and analysis of aircraft measurements. Preprint volume of the Tenth International Conference on Interactive Information and Processing Systems for Meteorology, Oceanography, and Hydrology, January 23-38, 1994, Nashville, TN. Published by the American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA.

3. Wyngaard, J.C. (1988): The effects of probe-induced flow distortion on atmospheric turbulence measurements: Extension to scalars. J. Atmos. Sci., 45, 3400-3412.




Investigators interested in discussing any use of the NSF/NCAR aircraft or its instrumentation, including questions on scheduling, may contact the Facility Liaison for Field Projects, voice: (303) 497-1058, FAX: (303) 497-1092, or via email.




Table 1
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
Basic Performance Figures
Dimensions
Length 102 ft
Wingspan 136 ft
Height 39 ft
Cabin Floor Area 414 sq ft
Weights
Gross Weight 155,000 lb max
Payload
23,000 lb max
13,000 lb with full fuel
Performance
Altitude 26,000 ft (max operating)
Range
1,800 nmi (at 1,000 ft cruise altitude)
2,500 nmi (at 10,000 ft cruise altitude)
3,100 nmi (at 20,000 ft cruise altitude)
Endurance 10.0 hours max with IFR reserve (single crew)
Speed 290 kt TAS (typical at cruise altitude)
(Airspeed limited to 250 kt IAS with instrument pods installed.)
Acceleration Limit +2.5 to 0 G (flight load)
Flight Crew Two pilots + flight engineer (Up to 16 seats available for project participants, depending on equipment payload)
Engines Four Allison T-56-A-423, 4,300 SHP each
Electrical Power
90 kVA, 115 Vac @ 400 Hz
21 kVA 115 Vac @ 60 Hz
400 A 28 Vdc
Base Jefferson County Airport, Broomfield, CO, USA (BJC)

Please Note: The figures quoted for payload, range, altitude, and endurance are maxima that may be reduced due to high temperatures, extensive IFR weather conditions or other factors too numerous to list here. In some circumstances, these values may be increased based on experience, base-instrumented weights, inclusion of extra flight crew, etc. Each project is planned and executed according to the circumstances prevailing at the time. See Research Aviation Facility Bulletin No. 6 for more details on C-130Q flight planning.

Due to insurance liability considerations, the crew must be limited to the necessary project participants. The maximum number of people on a given mission is 19.



C-130Q HERCULES CABIN PRESSURIZATION
Aircraft Altitude Cabin Pressure Differential
(cabin pressure - outside pressure)
5,000 ft 0 to 5.0 inches Hg
10,000 ft 0 to 9.2 inches Hg
15,000 ft 3.8 to 12.8 inches Hg
20,000 ft 6.7 to 15.1 inches Hg
25,000 ft 9.4 to 15.1 inches Hg


Table 2
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS
Page 1 of 6
Variable Measured Instrument Type Manufacturer & Model No. Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range accuracy Resolution
Aircraft Latitude (LAT) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS ± 90° ± 0.164°
(6 hr)
0.00017°
Aircraft Longitude (LON) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS ± 180° ± 0.164°
(6 hr)
0.00017°
Aircraft Position & Ground Speed (GLAT, GLON, GALT & GVEW, GVNS) GPS Navigation Sensor Trimble Navigation Model TANS III 4-Satellite, 3-D pos.
3-Satellite, 2-D pos.
± 100 M (horiz)
± 156 M (Vertical)
± 0.1 M/s (Velocity)
<= 0.5 M
<= 0.5 M
<= 0.05 M/s
Aircraft Ground Speed (VNS, VEW) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS 0 to 400 M/s ± 4.115 M/s
(6 hr)
0.0020 M/s
Aircraft Vertical Velocity (IVSPD) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS ± 200 M/s ± 0.1524 M/s
(6 hr)
0.0095 M/s
Aircraft True Heading (THDG) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS 0 to 360° ± 0.2 deg
(6 hr)
0.00017°
Aircraft Pitch Angle (PITCH) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS ± 90° ± 0.05°
(6 hr)
0.00017°
Aircraft Roll Angle (ROLL) Inertial Navigation System Honeywell Laseref SM IRS ± 180° ± 0.05°
(6 hr)
0.00017°


Table 2
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS
Page 2 of 6
Variable Measured Instrument Type Manufacturer & Model No. Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range Accuracy Resolution
Fuselage Static Pressure (PSFD) Oscillation Frequency (digital output) Rosemount, Inc. 1501 250 to 1035 mbar ± 1 mbar 0.034 mbar
Fuselage Static Pressure (PSF) Variable Capacitance Rosemount, Inc. 1201F 250 to 1035 mbar ± 1 mbar* 0.07 mbar
# Cabin Static Pressure (PCAB) Variable Capacitance Rosemount, Inc. 1201F 600 to 1035 mbar ± 1 mbar* 0.07 mbar
Indicated Airspeed Pressure (QCF, QCR) Variable Capacitance Rosemount, Inc. 1221 0 to 125 mbar ± 0.7 mbar 0.006 mbar
Total Air Temperature (TTR, TTL) Platinum Resistance Rosemount, Inc. 102E2AL -60 to +40 C ± 0.5°C 0.006°C
Total Air Temperature (TTWH) Deiced Platinum Resistance Rosemount, Inc. 102E -60 to +40 C ± 1.0°C 0.006°C
# Ambient Air Temperature (OAT) Infrared Thermometer @ 4.25 µM Ophir Corporation III -40 to +40 C ---- 0.05°C
Dew-Point Temperature (DPT, DPB) Thermoelectric Hygrometer General Eastern Instruments 1011B -65 to +50°C ± 0.5°C (> 0 C)
± 1.0°C (< 0 C)
0.006°C
## Dew-Point Temperature (DPCRC) Cryogenic Hygrometer NCAR-developed -85 to -15 C ± 0.5°C 0.01°C
*     Assuming transducer is exposed to < 1°C/min rate of temperature change

#    Available from RAF upon request
## Available from RAF via special arrangement


Table 2
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS
Page 3 of 6
Variable Measured Instrument Type Manufacturer & Model No. Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range Accuracy Resolution
# Absolute Humidity (RHOLA) * Lyman-alpha Hygrometer NCAR Developed LA-3 0.1 to 25 g/m3 ± 5 % ** 0.2 %
Angle of Attack (ADIFR) Flow Angle Sensor, Radome Rosemount, Inc. 1221F ± 10° ± 0.134° 0.002°
Angle of Sideslip (BDIFR) Flow Angle Sensor, Radome Rosemount, Inc. 1221F ± 5° ± 0.096° 0.002°
Radiometric Surface Temperature (RSTB, RSTB1) Bolometric Radiometer (spectral range 9.5 to 11.5 µM) Heimann Infrared Model KT19.85 -50 to +60 C ± 0.5°C (plus 0.7 % of difference between housing and object temperature) 0.005°C
# Radiometric Sky Temperature (RSTT) Bolometric Radiometer (spectral range 9.5 to 11.5 µM) Heimann Infrared Model KT19.85 -50 to +50 C ± 0.5°C (plus 0.7 % of difference between housing and object temperature) 0.1°C
Infrared Radiation (IRT, IRB) Pyrgeometer 3.5 to 50 µM (Silicon Dome) Eppley PIR (NCAR modified) 0 to 600 W/M2 ---- 0.40 W/M2
Visible Radiation (SWT, SWB) Pyranometer .285 to 2.8 µM (Clear Dome WG7) Eppley PSP (NCAR modified) 0 to 1500 W/M2 ---- 0.12 W/M2
Ultraviolet Radiation (UVT, UVB) Photometer .295 to .385 µM Eppley TUVR (NCAR modified) 0 to 200 W/M2 ---- 0.12 W/M2
## Spectral Vegetation Radiometer (WV650, WV862) Two-wavelength device (650 & 862 nm) NCAR Developed 1992 Suitable for characterizing Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (See NCAR Technical Note NCAR/TN-370+STR.)
*      Stub or crossflow type (Available only for high-rate projects)
**    Long-term accuracy is slaved to measurement from a thermoelectric hygrometer.

#      Available from RAF upon request
##   Available from RAF via special arrangement


Table 2
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS
Page 4 of 6
Variable Measured Instrument Type Manufacturer & Model No. Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range Accuracy Resolution
Geometric Altitude (HGM232) Radar Altimeter APN-232 0 to 8,000 M ---- 0.1 M
Cloud Liquid Water Content (PLWC) Heated-wire PMS Model KLWC-5 0 to 5 g/M3 0.02 g/M3 0.001 g/M3
Icing Rate Detector (RICE) Accretion of Cloud Droplets Rosemount, Inc. 871FA 0 to 0.5 mM increments ---- 0.0005 mM
# Photography S-VHS Video Cameras:
  • Forward-, Side- and Down-Looking (3 total)
  • Sony Model XC-999 color cameras with JVC Model HR-S4700U (S-VHS) recorders
  • Video title for data & time by "Horita GPS video Titler"
Up to 6 hours of recording per cassette (w/wo voice)
# Available from RAF upon request--must choose location(s) and direction(s)


Table 2
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS
Page 5 of 6
Variable Measured Instrument Type Manufacturer & Model No. Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range Accuracy Resolution
# Aerosol Spectrum (PCASP) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 0.12 to 3.12 µM ---- 0.025 to 0.375 µM (progressively weighted)
# Cloud Droplet Spectrum (FSSP-100) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 0.5 to 47 µM ---- Selectable 0.5, 1, 2, 3 µM
# Cloud Droplet Spectrum (FSSP-300) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 0.3 to 20 µM ---- 0.05 to 2.0 µM (progressively weighted)
# Cloud Droplet Spectrum (260X) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 40 to 620 µM ---- 10 µM
# Hydrometeor Spectrum (200Y) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 300 to 4,500 µM ---- 300 µM
# Cloud Particle Spectrum - 2D (2D-C) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 25 to 800 µM ---- 25 µM
# Hydrometeor Spectrum - 2D (2D-P) Laser Spectrometer Particle Measuring Systems, Inc. 200 to 6,400 µM ---- 200 µM
# Available from RAF upon request

 

Table 2
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS
Page 6 of 6
Variable Measured Instrument Type Manufacturer & Model No. Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range accuracy Detection Limit
## Cloud Droplet Nuclei (CVCNO, CVLA) Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) NCAR laboratory constructed 0 to 1,000 per cM3
0 to 20 g/M3
---- 1 per cM3
0.1 g/M3
# Aerosol Concentrations (CONCN) Butanol Condensation Nuclei TSI Model 3760 0 to 10,000 per cM3 ± 6%
(reading)
1 per cM3
(Selectable)
 
Variable Measured Manufacturer Principle of Operation Combined Performance of Transducer, Signal Conditioning, and Recorder
Range Accuracy Precision Time Response
# Ozone (TEO3C) Thermo Electron, Inc. UV Absorbance 0 to 1 ppmv ± 4 ppbv 1 ppbv 0.1 Hz
# Fast-Response Ozone (03FC) NCAR laboratory constructed NO2 Chemiluminescence 0 to 300 ppbv ± 5 % 0.5 ppbv
1ppbv
1 Hz
3Hz
# Carbon Monoxide (COCAL) Aero-Laser Vac UV Resonance Fluorescence 0 to 200 ppm ± 3 % 3 ppb 3 Hz
# High-Precision CO2 NCAR-modified LI-COR 6252 Non-dispersive IR Absorbance 0 to 500 ppmv < ± 0.5 ppmv 100 ppbv (typical) 0.05 Hz
# Available from RAF upon request
## Available from RAF via special arrangement


Table 3
NSF/NCAR C-130Q HERCULES (N130AR)
SPECIFICATIONS FOR AIR VELOCITY COMPONENTS
Variable Measured Instrument Type Range Accuracy (M/s) Resolution Upper Limit Frequency Response (Hz)
Relative, Short-term
(< 10 min)
Absolute, Long-term
(t in hours)
* Wind vector horizontal component (UI, VI) Input from radome gust probe and INS 0 to 100 M/s ± 0.1 ± (1.0 + 0.5t) ** 0.012 M/s 10
* Wind vector vertical component (WI) Input from radome gust probe and INS ± 15 M/s ± 0.1 ---- 0.012 M/s 10
Horizontal wind direction (WD) Input from radome gust probe and INS 0 to 360° ± COT-1 (UI/VI) ---- 0.001° 10
* RAF-computed winds are a combination of the mean and fluctuating components components (i.e., UI = UI + UI' ).
** With GPS corrections, long-term absolute accuracy improves to ± 1. M/s.

Last update: Jul 22  2003